Toontown Tuesdays: Gopher


The gopher from The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh was not actually in AA Milne’s original books. He was added by Walt Disney as a possible replacement for Piglet when the company was considering not using Piglet in the films. At some point, the decision was made to keep Piglet AND Gopher, whose first joke was written by Walt Disney himself- “I’m not in the book, you know!” Referring to both the fact that he was not in AA Milne’s book and also not in the phone book.

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Mickey Mondays: The First Mickey Merchandise

Mickey Mouse has appeared on millions of pieces of merchandise over the years. Despite being introduced 90 years ago, his merchandise empire is still worth billions of dollars each year. 
Like the rest of his story, Mickey’s merchandise empire began humbly. Mickey Mouse had taken the world by storm, capturing the hearts of children all over the world. At the time, licensed merchandise was in its infancy, so the Disneys didn’t put much effort behind it. Mickey Mouse was seemingly tailor made for toys, however, so it would only be a matter of time before manufacturers began beating down their door. A paper tablet manufacturer stopped Walt Disney in a hotel lobby and offered $300 to produce a line of Mickey Mouse paper tablets. The studio really needed the cash, so Walt quickly agreed. The Disney merchandising empire began.

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Theme Park Thursdays: A Walk in the Park?

A day at DISNEYLAND typically involves a lot of walking. If several things had happened as originally planned, it would have involved a lot more walking.
Before there was DISNEYLAND, there was Disneylandia. Disneylandia was to be a traveling exhibit of Disney-related miniatures that would travel from town to town on a train. During Disneylandia’s week in town, guests could purchase tickets to tour the walk-through exhibits. After a financial analysis of the project, it was not deemed feasible because not enough paying customers could walk through the exhibit to break even. Walt Disney shelved the idea, which eventually became DISNEYLAND.

Years later when Walt Disney was planning out DISNEYLAND, he again considered another walk-through attraction based on Alice in Wonderland. Yet again, it was seen as not being feasible as a walk-through attraction because of the film’s popularity and the large crowds that it would attract. The walk-through became a ride-through.

Apparently not one to give up on the walk-through concept completely, Walt Disney’s original plans for Pirates of the Caribbean called for it to be a walk-through Pirate Museum. After his ideas became too big for a museum, Walt Disney changed his plans and Pirates of the Caribbean became a boat ride.




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