Food Fridays: End of an Era

One of the first rules that Walt Disney himself had set at DISNEYLAND was that alcoholic beverages would not be allowed in his Magic Kingdom. At the time, seedy amusement parks and creaky carnivals served booze, which often led to fights. Mr. Disney wanted to avoid these problems and differentiate his Park from those tacky places, so he banned alcohol from the park. Guests who wanted to indulge in a drink had to take the monorail to the DISNEYLAND Hotel.

The rule was relaxed somewhat in the late 1960’s. The park’s major sponsors wanted a place where they could take their clients that would provide a more private experience and alcoholic beverages. Walt Disney resisted this, but his brother Roy insisted it was necessary to keep the all important sponsorship money flowing into the company. Thus Club 33 was born, a private club located above New Orleans Square.


When the Florida Magic Kingdom Park was opened, the no alcohol policy continued. That park would not have a private  club, so Florida’s DISNEYLAND clone would actually be drier than its older inspiration. In 1982, the no alcohol in the parks rule would be completely scrapped. Epcot Center’s World Showcase would Feature a plethora of alcoholic drinks. The park’s educational focus would keep most of the rowdier type of guests away, so it was seen as okay to bring out the booze.


Therefore the new rule was that Disney’s DISNEYLAND clones would not serve alcohol, but other types of parks could. This rule was revised after EuroDisney opened, since it was believed that Europeans would not visit a dry park. The opening of the Be Our Guest Restaurant inside Florida’s Magic Kingdom Park introduced alcohol to the park, leaving the original DISNEYLAND as the only Disney park without alcoholic beverages.


That 64 year tradition will go away next year after the opening of the Star Wars area inside DISNEYLAND. The Cantina located there will offer alcoholic beverages inside the park. Interestingly, the park tried to hide the news in a vague press release and only lukewarmly confirmed it when pressed by reporters. This gambit backfired on them, as most stories about the new Cantina are solely focusing on the alcohol aspect of the story. The world is much different than it was in 1955. People know what to expect at a Disney theme park now, so they probably won’t be too put off when they see adult beverages inside DISNEYLAND.




from Blogger https://ift.tt/2C4PRyt
via IFTTT

Toontown Tuesdays: Mickey Mouse By The Years 1929

After the amazing success of Steamboat Willie, the Disney Brothers were eager to prove that Mickey Mouse wasn’t just a fad. Production of Mickey Mouse shorts continued at a quick pace in 1929, including the short Karnival Kid, which was the first to feature Mickey Mouse actually talking.

Mickey’s first words, voiced by Walt Disney himself, were “Hot dogs!” This Mouse proved that he wasn’t a fad.

from Blogger https://ift.tt/2BUxRXf
via IFTTT

Mickey Mondays: Mickey Mouse By The Years 1928

On November 18, 1928 at Universal’s Colony Theater in New York City, Mickey Mouse made his grand debut in Steamboat Willie. The cartoon was an instant sensation as the very first sound cartoon ever produced.

While it was the first Mickey Mouse cartoon released, it was actually the third Mickey Mouse cartoon produced. After the release of the first sound feature The Jazz Singer, Walt Disney put the other two shorts on hold so that Mickey Mouse would be introduced to the world with a soundtrack. 

Walt Disney created Mickey Mouse as a way to recover from the loss of his previous character Oswald. Mickey Mouse would succeed beyond even Walt Disney’s wildest dreams.

from Blogger https://ift.tt/2wkhM89
via IFTTT

Food Fridays: California Oranges

Before DISNEYLAND opened in 1955, one of the things that tourists did when they visited Southern California was to drive out to orange groves and take pictures of themselves picking oranges. (The other big attractions were Hollywood and the beaches, of course.) After DISNEYLAND opened, people were less enamored with looking at orange groves, so the largest orange grower Sunkist decided that if the tourists were no longer coming out to them, they would come out to the tourists.

The Sunkist Citrus House opened on Main Street, replacing a bakery that had originally taken the spot. Sunkist sold simple baked goods and freshly squeezed orange juice and lemonade. While the Citrus house was profitable, its main goal was to advertise oranges to the tourists who, it was hoped, would go home and look for Sunkist in their local grocery stores. The refreshing drinks were so popular, a second location was opened in Adventureland and was given an unusual name- “Sunkist, I Presume?”


Both locations remained open until the 1980’s. Sunkist decided to change its marketing efforts and DISNEYLAND was looking to operate most of its food locations. “Sunkist, I Presume?” became the Bengal Barbecue, while the Main Street Citrus House would become an ice cream parlor, a bakery (again) and an ice cream parlor (again).




from Blogger https://ift.tt/2NbDkKv
via IFTTT