Freaky Fridays: No Mustaches at DISNEYLAND.

One of the earliest rules for working at DISNEYLAND was that Mustaches and beards were forbidden. 

Who put this rule into place? It was Walt Disney himself, who felt that Mustaches would make his employees look like “city slickers” instead of the more rural and wholesome look he was going for at the Magic Kingdom. Despite having one himself.



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Theme Park Thursdays: Horses Only

Walt Disney was a huge fan of carousels. He wanted a majestic carousel in the middle of his Fantasyland, one that featured only carousel horses that were leaping. Rather than fabricate a new carousel, Walt Disney bought an existing one that he Disney-fied, turning it into a dazzling showpiece that was worthy of its placement in Walt Disney’s Magic Kingdom.

But most carousels had stationary seats and benches. Whatever happened to them? Rather than throw them away, Walt Disney used them for another Fantasyland attraction. The train cars used for Casey Jr’s Circus Train came from the carousel, repurposed for Walt’s magic little train.

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Toontown Tuesdays: “No” White

When DISNEYLAND first opened, Walt Disney saw the Fantasyland attractions as being a way for his guests to enter the world of his animated features. As a result, he decreed that the attractions would not feature their titular characters. After all, *you* would be experiencing things as Snow White or Peter Pan might have seen them.

However, this confused park guests, who assumed that they would actually get to see Snow White when they rode her attraction. It didn’t take long for the park to change things up and include Snow White in subsequent upgrades.



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Music Mondays: DISNEYLAND Records Release #16: Tutti’s Trumpets


Tutti Camarata had been given free reign by Walt Disney to work on any project he wished in between his assigned projects. This allowed Camarata to produce more esoteric albums that probably wouldn’t have seen the light of day otherwise. One such project was Tutti’s Trumpets, which unsurprisingly featured Camarata’s compositions and arrangements played on trumpets. It was an odd choice for a release from a children’s record label named after a theme park, but it gained a cult following and became a must have recording for trumpet aficionados.


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